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Halfway

June 25, 2018

Today I had my fourth dose of chemotherapy, which means I’m halfway done! Besides being my fourth dose, it was also my last dose of the AC part. This means no more Neulasta devices on my arm. No more nurses in hazmat suits injecting the red chemo. Hopefully no more concern of nausea or mouth sores (though I haven’t really struggled with either.) The second half of my regimen, taxol, is said to be easier than the first, so I’m looking forward to that.

The last few weeks have been pretty good. We were in California and Tahoe for one of them, and came back here for my third dose on June 11. Jonathan had a lot of days of work when we got back so my sister Christine came to stay with us for almost two weeks.  I was really tired as I had been before, but didn’t really have another symptoms. I took a two hour nap just about every afternoon that week. I had a little peach fuzz that had started to grow back and about half of it fell out after my next treatment.

In spite of the tiredness, Christine and I were still able to paint the front room that week by working a couple hours here and there. We also bought a twin bed frame for Alida off the FB marketplace and started refinishing it, and started redoing an ugly cabinet we had been storing the games in. A friend also came over one afternoon with some peaches and tomatoes and we made peach butter and salsa! We literally did things in fits and spurts all week as my energy (and Christine monitoring my energy) would allow, but it was so gratifying to be doing normal things.

Giving new life to old, ugly furniture.

Later in the week, though, I started to feel the emotional effects of being so tired. I think on Thursday I had moments of “how could I survive if my whole life felt like this?” and feeling like I’ll never have a normal life again. It’s hard to not be able to do the things I want to do and be with and care for the girls how I want. Usually we know that it’s temporary, but I think anyone who has been sick for a while knows that you have those “is life always going to be like this?” days.

I also started to think about the possibility of metastasis. (This was probably another emotional effect of my exhaustion.) I have no reason to think this will happen, but given the ever-surprising nature of my cancer, I put together a few different conversations and some random coughing I was doing and started thinking about a less optimistic future. It’s no fun to even tell people you are worried about it, but I imagine that everyone close to me thinks about it sometimes. It’s obviously better not to dwell on negative outcomes, but it’s impossible to keep it from coming into your mind. I did eventually share my fears with a few people, and they eventually became less bothersome.

So while I’m on the subject, I’ll fast forward to today. I had to see my surgeon this morning before my blood draw, because last Thursday, I felt like a needle was trying to stab its way out of my chest near my port. By this morning, it had (of course) resolved, but we still went in. Dr. G said that there are three permanent stitches necessary to hold a port in place. They have to have longer tails before they are thicker material, and sometimes the tail flips around and starts stabbing outward. So it’s normal, and she told me how to massage it around should I happen again.

While we were there, I asked her about some “bright spots” in my lungs she had seen on my PET scan in March. I told her how I was concerned about this given how quickly I went from all clear (October 2017) to having cancer again (February 2018). First she said that these types of bright spots aren’t unusual and are usually indicative of some type of small infection (not her exact words.) The spots are also too small to identify and too small to biopsy. Second, she told me that she thought they just didn’t get all the cancer in the fall. That it wasn’t some kind of crazy cancer, rather it wasn’t all removed to begin with. I told her how my previous surgeon how dubbed it the serial killer cancer. She didn’t agree. She was really happy to see how well I was doing and pushed our next visit until after I finish chemo. Says she just wants to see how her patients are faring and since she’s seen me, we are good. It was such an encouraging and comforting visit.

Next I got my port accessed and my blood drawn. They are also doing a tumor marker this time. I’ll find out those results in a few days. We went upstairs to see Dr. Z who didn’t have much to say except that I was doing great and that I’ll have a CT scan in the next couple weeks just to give me some peace of mind. Also that one of the main side effects of taxol is tingling in your fingertips.

My friend Charity has been offering to refresh me on knitting (I used to knit about 10 years ago). I was hesitant since I don’t want to make scarves in the heat of the summer, but she reminded me about the book we both have where you learn all the different ways of knitting by making 64 different squares that will eventually become an afghan. Since making an afghan is on my bucket list, I agreed, and she came up to sit with me during my treatment. I haven’t had anyone sit with me or visit since it’s usually only a couple hours and is preceded by other appointments that Jonathan joins me for, but it worked out really well today so he could leave, do some errands and get the kids from school.

The whole afghan will not be these colors. We were just practicing 🙂

I was surprisingly excited when the nursed unhooked me at the end of the treatment. I think as much you can know that time will pass and treatments will pass, sometimes it’s hard to believe it. Yet here I am, finishing the last of “the hard treatments.” Halfway through this crazy chemo ride. I still have to get through the effects of this dose, but I’m hoping that knowing I won’t have to go through these particular side effects again will help me.

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Peace out, AC!

3 Comments leave one →
  1. June 25, 2018 21:47

    So glad to hear the happy mixed with the nitty gritty stuff. You are amazing!

    On Mon, Jun 25, 2018 at 5:44 PM Sweet dreams and flying machines wrote:

    > Grace Lewis posted: “Today I had my fourth dose of chemotherapy, which > means I’m halfway done! Besides being my fourth dose, it was also my last > dose of the AC part. This means no more Neulasta devices on my arm. No more > nurses in hazmat suits injecting the red chemo. Hopeful” >

  2. Andy Zimmerman permalink
    June 26, 2018 09:54

    Kim and I continue to pray for you daily, Grace. Thank you for sharing your cancer journey. It’s been very helpful for me as I just finished my first cycle of the CAPOX regimen. I get a two-week “chemo vacation” to walk my daughter. Katie, down the aisle on the 14th of July. Then, start cycle 2 on the 17th.

    I take oral Xeloda pills every day for the first two weeks of each cycle, plus an IV infusion of Oxaliplatin on Day One of each cycle. The third week is for R&R.

    The Oxaliplatin is the mean stuff. Week One of each cycle, therefore, is a bit rough. Can’t drink or even handle anything cold. If I do, it feels like I’m drinking egg shells. Plus, the fatigue makes it where I can’t even stand five minutes on my feet. Gets better by Week Two.

    Doing the oral Xeloda avoids the need to install a port in my chest and carry around a portable pump for two days. The downside is taking a handful of horse pills every day for two weeks.

  3. Ruth Petersen permalink
    June 27, 2018 11:05

    thank you Grace for writing about this journey, I Love you and I am always happy to read about your progress .. Thankful the first and I pray the worst is over, hoping in the very near future you can look back at this trip through the cancer hell and only remember all the awesome support you received from those who love you…Please know I continue to keep you and your family in my prayers….love and ((hugs)) Ruth

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